Posts Tagged ‘age-related macular degeneration’


Eye Care Over 40 – Things Do Change…

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 
   

SIf you are over 40 years of age, you’ve probably noticed changes in your vision. Difficulty seeing clearly for reading and close work are among the most common problems adults develop between ages 41 to 60. However, this is also the time when other changes in your eyes can start to affect your work and enjoyment of life.  Keep reading, and if you are experiencing any of these issues, call South Georgia Eye Partners today for an appointment.  We can help your eyes age gracefully.

Beginning in the early to mid-forties, most adults may start to experience problems with their ability to see clearly at close distances, especially for reading and computer tasks. This normal aging change in the eye’s focusing ability, called presbyopia, will continue to progress over time.

Many people in middle age begin to experience difficulty with their vision.

Initially, you may find you need to hold reading materials farther away to see them clearly. Print in the newspaper or on a restaurant menu may appear blurred, especially under dim lighting. If you already wear prescription glasses or contact lenses to see clearly in the distance, the near vision changes caused by presbyopia can bring about the need to use bifocal or multifocal lenses. If you are nearsighted, you may have discovered that you now need to remove your glasses to see better up close. Fortunately, people with presbyopia now have many options to improve their ability to see well.

Along with the onset of presbyopia, an increase in the incidence of eye health problems occurs during these years. Whether or not there is a need for eyeglasses, adults should be examined for signs of developing eye and vision problems. A comprehensive eye examination is recommended at least every two years. Don’t rely on an insufficient substitute like the limited driver’s license vision test or other vision screenings to determine if you have an eye or vision problem.

Adults over 40 may be particularly at risk for the development of eye and vision problems if any of the following exist:

  • Chronic, systemic conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure.
  • A family history of glaucoma or macular degeneration.
  • A highly visually demanding job or work in an eye-hazardous occupation.
  • Health conditions like high cholesterol, thyroid conditions, anxiety or depression, and arthritis for which you take medications. Many medications, even antihistamines, have ocular side-effects.

Call us today if you are just beginning to experience some of these problems or even if you’ve been struggling with them for awhile.  South Georgia Eye Partners’ board certified ophthalmologists and optometrists are here to help

Source: American Optometric Association


Make Eye Health A Priority

Monday, May 14th, 2012 
   

May is Healthy Vision Month, and therefore, it’s the perfect time to schedule a comprehensive eye exam to make sure you are seeing your best. Don’t wait until there’s a problem to start paying attention to your eye health.

Many common eye diseases that can lead to vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic eye disease, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), often have no early warning signs or symptoms. And, the risk of vision loss or blindness is higher for some people based on race, ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, it’s important to be proactive when it comes to your vision.

You might be at higher risk for eye disease if you have a family history of vision problems; have diabetes; are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native; or are older than 50. Some diseases affect certain populations disproportionately.

  • Glaucoma, which affects your side or peripheral vision first, is three times more common in African Americans and is their leading cause of blindness.
  • Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness caused by uncontrolled diabetes, occurs more often in Hispanics/Latinos.
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives are 35 percent more likely to have diabetes than the average adult in the United States, putting them at an increased risk of diabetic eye disease.
  • Older adults are at higher risk of developing age-related eye diseases and conditions  such as AMD, glaucoma or cataracts. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Whites.

If you are at a higher risk of eye disease, having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the best thing you can do to protect your vision. It is a painless procedure where your eye doctor puts drops in the eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupil so he or she can get a good look at the back of the eye to check for signs of eye disease. You can also request an Optomap as part of your eye exam. The Optomap image allows your physician to view 82% of the retina versus traditional methods that only reveal 10-12% of the retina at one time. It is therefore another important tool for the screening and early visualization of eye problems.

In addition to having regular eye exams, eating a healthy diet, not smoking and wearing protective eyewear are just a few other things you can do to protect your vision.

 

*Source: National Eye Institute