Posts Tagged ‘blurred vision’


I SURVIVED ILASIK!

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 
   

 Well, after 8 years of living, breathing and preaching Lasik, I finally experienced the procedure for myself!  Why did I wait so long you ask?  It’s kind of like the woman who’s husband is a builder yet she lives in shanty town.  I’ve seen my best friend, my husband and countless others lay under that machine, but it just never occurred to me that I should do it.  Don’t get me wrong, I was not tied to my glasses, I could fake it. However, my tricks eventually began to wear thin when patients started to notice that the woman selling them Lasik was holding the paper two feet from her face and holding her eye lids just as high as they would possibly stretch.  I agree, it was not a pretty sight! So on June 28, 2011, I became another truly satisfied patient.
Before it all began that day I was so excited!  I was telling everyone I was going to do it. Ilasik is great and ilasik is for me! I must admit though, when everything went quiet, it was like someone slapped me across the face and said WHAT WERE YOU THINKING? ARE YOU CRAZY?  I must admit it was a bit scary lying beneath that machine,  but when I heard a firm voice saying it was too late to back out, I immediately relaxed and proceeded to travel to my happy place.  I began to calm  and remember just exactly WHO was working on my eyes. It was the man I have called boss for 8 years, the man I would trust with my mom, the man I would trust with my child – Dr. Scott Petermann.
While visiting my happy place, from time to time I would here a word of encouragement and see a few flashing lights. Not once did I feel pain. When all was said and done and my vision cleared, I saw our head technician, Victoria holding out her hands to me.  I sat up in amazement!  I could see!
I was then led to an exam room where after being checked by the doctor, I was handed my bag of drops and out the door I went.  I went home, ordered take out, milked every ounce of sympathy out of my husband, then headed off to la la land as instructed.  I awoke the next morning to a whole new world!  Sure it was still a bit hazy, sure my eyes are a little red, sure people run screaming from me due to lack of eye makeup, but I CAN SEE! I can read! I can text! I can Facebook!  All without stretching my arms out and hiking my top lids over my eyebrows!
So, if you have questions about iLASIK, just call me, Karen Canada. I have the brochures, photos and all the info you will ever need.  I can even help you find your happy place!


Preparing for an Eye Exam

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 
   

An eye exam is not like a shopping trip to the grocery store.  It is a medical exam to see if your eyes are healthy and if necessary, to get glasses for a visual deficiency.  Being prepared for your eye exam will make the experience more pleasant.  The first step is to make an appointment with your eye doctor.  Have your name, phone number, address and insurance information available.  On the day of your appointment, try to be a few minutes early as there may be health forms that need updating.  Please take your insurance information and all of your medications with you.

We are a medical practice with four doctors and they see surgery patients as well as emergencies.  Some patients are coming in for testing only or to pick up glasses or contact lenses.  Every patient’s insurance has to be verified by their insurance company the day of service.  Please keep all these things in mind when patients are not called in the order in which they sign in.

During your exam, the doctor will check the health of your eyes.  This sometimes requires dilation of the pupils to allow him to view the retina.  The effects of dilation are blurred reading vision for a few hours afterward and large pupils which could last up to a day depending on the patient.  If you are dilated, disposable sunglasses are provided. We will test for glasses if necessary and there are other tests that may be ordered by the doctor if he sees a problem.  We perform a thorough exam.

At the end of the exam, the doctor will explain his findings and recommendations.  Our doctors treat and specialize in a variety of eye problems and recommend a yearly exam.  We have clinics in Tifton and Valdosta for your convenience, so call us for your yearly eye appointment!


Survey Says……

Monday, February 14th, 2011 
   

Many Americans Miss the Mark on Eye Exams.

A recent survey of 1,000 adults shows that nearly half — 47% — worry more about losing their sight than about losing their memory and their ability to walk or hear. But almost 30% indicated that they don’t get their eyes checked. Many Americans are unaware of the warning signs of eye diseases and conditions that could cause damage and blindness if not detected and treated soon enough.

It’s necessary to see an optometrist or ophthalmologist regularly in order to keep your eyes in good working order. Diseases and conditions of the eye can often be treated successfully if caught early. Eye professionals recommend that everyone see an eye doctor at least every two years. Many people should see their eye doctors more often. According to the American Optometric Association and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, factors such as age, eye health and family health history determine how often one should have a complete eye exam.

Call today to schedule your annual eye exam.

Karen Canada

Refractive Surgery and Marketing Director


WoW! I can see..

Friday, November 19th, 2010 
   

A little over a month ago I had Intralase. I have had to depend on glasses ever since I was nine years old. So, when the opportunity to have the corrective surgery, especially Intralase, at the age of twenty-two arose I jumped on it. I am so glad that I did. Intralase is the best decision I have ever made. Dr. Petermann explained the procedure to me and made sure that I understood all about it.

Of course when the big day arrived I was NERVOUS, who wouldn’t be. Once the procedure got started I relaxed and saw that there was nothing to it. I was amazed that when I got up from the table I could see. The rest of that day and night I took it easy resting my eyes and keeping them closed, so to heal properly.

Later on that night I opened my eyes and could see a clock across the room. That is when it hit me “WOW, I can see without my glasses or contacts!!” You couldn’t get me to stop smiling. Everyone that I would see I would tell them about Intralase and how it changed my life. I would and do recommend Intralase to anyone and everyone! Intralase is the best and Dr. Petermann and his techs are the best to do it! 🙂

Whitney


Intralase Versus Traditional LASIK

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010 
   

Over my past 10 years practicing optometry and comanaging all different types of refractive surgery, I have never had more reason to be excited to offer surgery as an alternative to glasses or contact lenses for my patients.

The accuracy and precision provided by a three dimensional laser incision rather than the one dimensional cut of the microkeratomes steel blade results in higher quality post-operative vision that is apparent even the first day after surgery.

How does the IntraLase Method work?
The IntraLase Method uses tiny, rapid pulses of laser light to create your corneal flap — instead of using a metal blade — during the first step of LASIK. Each pulse of light passes through the top layers of your cornea and forms a microscopic bubble at a specific depth and position within your eye that is determined by the doctor. The IntraLase laser moves back and forth across your eye, creating a uniform layer of bubbles just beneath your corneal surface.
Just prior to applying laser vision correction, the doctor creates your corneal flap by gently separating the tissue where these bubbles have formed. The corneal flap is then folded back so the doctor can perform the second step of your LASIK treatment.
Please take a few minutes to watch how the procedure is performed.
What is the difference between a corneal flap created with the IntraLase Method and one created with a microkeratome?
The microkeratome is a hand-held instrument, which contains a steel blade that moves back and forth and creates a cut as it travels across the cornea. A microkeratome is only capable of making a single, one-dimensional cut across the cornea. As it cuts, the blade oscillates back and forth, which can leave an irregular surface after the flap is lifted. This can affect the quality of your postoperative vision.
Because of the unique way in which the IntraLase Method creates a precisely positioned layer of bubbles just beneath the surface of your eye, it creates a smooth even surface after your flap is lifted. With the IntraLase Method, a blade never touches your eye.
Dr. Eric Kolisz
http://www.intralasefacts.com/FAQ/

Short Arm Syndrome!

Thursday, November 4th, 2010 
   

Sooner or later, everyone will probably experience trouble reading.  Most people will begin to notice some blurring of smaller print between the ages of 40 to 50.  This condition is called presbyopia and is related to aging.  As we all grow older, the lenses in our eyes become less flexible and lose the ability to accomodate reading of smaller print.  Thus we  have to hold things farther out to see them clearly.  Most people will be able to use over the counter reading glasses but need to see their eye doctor first to be sure that is the problem.  Their doctor can tell them what strength is needed .  If the wrong strength is used,  the wearer can end up with eye strain and headaches.   So before you head to the store for some “cheaters”, please schedule an appointment with us to make sure your eyes are healthy! 

Lynn Peavy, Ophthalmic Technician