Posts Tagged ‘eye allergies’


Dr. Valerie Ferrell: Focus on Allergic Conjunctivitis of the Eye

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018 
   

With all the pollen we’ve seen in South Georgia and North Florida recently, allergy season is already in full swing.  We definitely have a few more months to endure, and along with that, often comes eye allergies.

Allergic conjunctivitis is the swelling of the conjunctiva (membrane covering the white part of the eye) due to allergies.  Allergies differ among patients, obviously, but the most common cause is hay fever.  Symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis often include: ocular itching, eyelid swelling, tearing, watery eyes, and a foreign body sensation – feeling that something is in your eye.  Usually when the weather is warm and dry, symptoms are often worse – which is why spring and summer can bring on an onslaught of this condition.

One of South Georgia / North Florida’s optometrists, Dr. Valerie Ferrell, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic conjunctivitis.  With years of experience in treating patients with this condition, she can minimize your discomfort and individualize treatment to your particular situation.

“I would advise people that there are several eye conditions that can mimic allergies such as dry eye and ‘pink eye’,” says Dr. Ferrell.  “They need to see an eye care professional before self medicating with over the counter allergy eye drops to ensure a speedy recovery.”

Treatment for allergic conjunctivitis can include anything from simple antihistamines and allergy drops to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) to possible surgical intervention in severe cases.   Eye Partners’ physicians diagnose and treat a number of eye diseases and disorders such as dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, cataracts and others.  They can help make allergy season a lot more tolerable for you if you suffer from this particular condition as well.

Call us today for an appointment – with offices in Valdosta, Tifton, Moultrie, Douglas and Madison, FL, we’re sure to have a location convenient to you.  Visit our website, southgeorgiaeye.com, for more information.


What To Do When Eye Allergies Spring Up

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012 
   

March 20, 2012

Today marks the official first day of spring; however, you may have been feeling the onset of warmer weather – and allergies – for the past couple of weeks. This time of year is great for all kinds of outdoor activities, but it is notorious for causing itchy, watery eyes and can be particularly hard on contact lens wearers.

But, you don’t have to endure eye allergies all season long. When symptoms kick in, many people visit the local drug store to pick up a systemic antihistamine for relief; however, while these medications can clear up symptoms like runny noses, sneezing and coughing, they can actually make ocular conditions worse by reducing tear quantity and quality. So, if you’re experiencing dry, itchy, watery and/or red eyes, it’s best to schedule an appointment with your optometrist. Since treating vision-related allergies is not a one-size-fits-all approach, be sure to describe your conditions in detail so your optometrist can prescribe the most effective treatment.

In addition to visiting your optometrist for a prescribed eye allergy treatment, there are also some small everyday things you can to limit the severity of symptoms.

  • Limit exposure to environmental allergies by keeping windows closed during the worst parts of the season and by washing your eyes after being outside.
  • Don’t touch or rub your eyes.
  • Avoid sharing, and in some cases, wearing eye makeup.
  • Wash bed linens and pillowcases in hot water and detergent to reduce allergens.
  • For contact lens wearers, remember that extended wearing times, infrequent replacement of lenses and use of potentially irritating contact lens care products can significantly exaggerate symptoms. Proper lens care is an important part of keeping eyes comfortable and safe.
See the difference this spring by scheduling an appointment!
Source: American Optometric Association (aoa.org)