Posts Tagged ‘eye doctor Valdosta’


Pediatric Eye Care – More Important than You May Realize

Monday, February 8th, 2016 
   

sAt South Georgia Eye Partners, we know that your kids are your top priority. You are always thinking about their schoolwork, their happiness, their overall well-being…and you should also being thinking about their eye health.  Our optometrists want to make sure your kids’ vision is the best it can be.

View Video

Good vision can make a difference in the classroom, playing sports, and in their overall quality of life.  You owe it to the little ones in your life to call today and make an appointment.

 

 


Can You Recognize the Symptoms of “Pink Eye”

Wednesday, September 16th, 2015 
   

eye

With school back in session, we anticipate an increasing number of patients with conjunctivitis, otherwise known as “pink eye.” South Georgia Eye Partners wants families, teachers and day care workers to be informed and learn to recognize the symptoms in order to avoid contracting the infection or spreading it to others.

Conjunctivitis, commonly referred to as “pink eye” is an inflammation or infection of the thin transparent layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eyelid that covers the white part of the eye. Several factors including viral or bacterial infection, allergic reaction and certain chemicals cause a person to contract conjunctivitis.  Peaslee said that most cases they’ve seen have been viral, probably an adeno virus; however, they have not asked patients to incur the cost of laboratory diagnosis since it does not change the treatment.

The bacterial and viral forms are highly contagious, especially among children; therefore, it is important that you take note if you are experiencing symptoms such as:

  • Red, very swollen, painful eyes and/or eyelids
  • Watery mucus discharge
  • Upper respiratory symptoms
  • Fever

If experiencing symptoms, first and foremost, do everything you can to avoid spreading the infection to family members, friends and co-workers.  Actions include frequent, thorough hand washing and no sharing of towels, washcloths and pillows. Additionally, it’s a good idea for the infected person not to share a sink with others. Next, individuals should seek care from an optometrist or ophthalmologist as soon as symptoms begin to manifest. Contact lenses wearers should stop wearing lenses and discard them along with cases and open bottles of solution.

Treatment for conjunctivitis depends on its cause. For the particular type of conjunctivitis South Georgia Eye Partners’ physicians see most often, an antibiotic to prevent secondary infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drops, anti-histamine drops, and in some cases, corticosteroid eye drops are typical treatments. In a few severe cases, patients have been placed on oral antihistaminic and oral anti-inflammatory medications.

Unfortunately, individuals are contagious before they have symptoms; therefore, it is very important to practice good hygiene to control the spreading of conjunctivitis.

  • Don’t touch or rub your eyes with your hands
  • Wash your hands thoroughly and frequently
  • Change your towel or washcloth daily
  • Discard eye cosmetics (particularly mascara)
  • Don’t use anyone else’s eye cosmetics or personal eye care items

The worst symptoms last seven to ten days but it may take patients up to a month to completely resolve the infection. Some patients may also experience ocular sensitivity, inflammation and “dry eyes” up to three months after the infection.

South Georgia Eye Partners is dedicated to educating the public on the infection.   Additionally, strict measures are taken in the South Georgia Eye Partners offices to ensure everything is thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.  Hand cleaner dispensers are placed throughout each office for patients, family members and staff to use frequently.

If not properly diagnosed and managed, complications from conjunctivitis can arise. Therefore, we recommend individuals with symptoms seek care immediately and encourage those exposed take all necessary precautions to prevent contracting the infection.

To learn more or to schedule an appointment, call us.


Are You EyeSmart? Get an Eye Exam!

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013 
   

Getting an eye exam is an important part of staying healthy.  When should you get an eye exam an what should it cover?  Read up on the basics.

When should you have an eye exam?

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Optometric Association recommend that you get a baseline eye exam if you have reached the age of 40 and have no previous eyesight issues.  If you have an eye disease or if you have a risk factor for developing one (such as diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of eye disease) you should see an ophthalmologist or optometrist prior to the age of 40.

What are the basics of an eye exam?

  • Your medical history – assessment of your vision, overall health and family’s medical history
  • Your visual acuity – reading standardized eye charts
  • Your pupils – observing your pupils by shining a bright beam of light
  • Your side vision – loss of side vision can be a sign of glaucoma
  • Your eye movement – this test, called motility, evaluates the movement of your eyes
  • Keratometry – this test measure the curvature of the cornea by focusing a circle of light on the cornea and measuring reflection
  • Your prescription for corrective lenses if you wear glasses or contacts – you will be asked to view an eye chart through a device called a phoroptor which contains different lenses to detect what’s best for your eyes
  • Your eye pressure – this test, called tonometry, measures the pressure within the eye that can detect glaucoma
  • The front part of your eye – a type of microscope called a slit lamp is used to illuminate the front part of your eye and can reveal if you’re developing cataracts or have scars or scratches on your cornea
  • Your retina and optic nerve – your eye doctor will put drops in your eye to dilate, or widen, your eye to allow him or her to thoroughly examine your retina and optic nerve for signs of damage from disease

South Georgia Eye Partners’ Optometrists, Eric Kolisz, O.D., Alan Peaslee, O.D., M.S., and Ann Patel, O.D., perform full service eye exams, and our ophthalmologists, Dr. Scott Petermann and Dr. Wes Ross are board certified and able to meet your ophthalmology needs.  If it’s time to get your eyes checked, call and make an appointment.  Take care of those eyes!


We Now Carry HydroEye & Macro Pro-S Supplements!

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013 
   
South Georgia Eye Partners is proud to announce that we are now carrying two supplements highly recommended by doctors to help with some of the most common eye health issues – HydroEye & Macro Pro-S.
HydroEye is a patented, oral formulation that provides continuous relief from dry eye discomfort due toage, contact lens wear, computer use, LASIK surgery, frequent flying, and other causes.  We have had a great response to HydroEye, and many patients can tell a difference after only two weeks.
Macro Pro-S provides nutrition support for macular degeneration and whole body health.  Based on the AREDS clinical trial and other advanced research, Macro Pro-S is an all-in-one formulation to help protect eyesight and the health of the entire body.  Note that the Macro Pro-S vitamins that we carry can be used by smokers and non-smokers unlike Macro Pro.

What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013 
   

Chances are, you’ve heard of macular degeneration. But do you know what the disease actually is? Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a breakdown of the eye’s macula. The macula is a small area in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye) that is responsible for your central vision and for allowing you to see fine details clearly. This is the part of the eye that makes it possible for you to thread a needle or read fine print.

Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body’s natural aging process, but what are the symptoms and what can be done?

Symptoms of age-related macular degeneration include:

  • Blurry distance and/or reading vision
  • Need for increasingly bright light in order to see up close
  • Colors appear less vivid or bright
  • Hazy vision
  • Difficulty seeing when going from bright light to low light
  • Trouble or inability to recognize people’s faces
  • Blank or blurry spot in your central vision

If you are diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration, there are treatment options. A large scientific study (source: aao.org) has shown that antioxidant vitamins and zinc may reduce the impact of macular degeneration in some people by slowing its progression toward more advanced stages. Macro Pro-S is a vitamin supplement providing powerful protection for macular & whole body health. It offers nutrients at levels found to preserve eyesight in the AREDS clinical trial, 10 mg of lutein and over 30 other key ingredients.

South Georgia Eye Partners now carries Macro Pro-S which can be taken by smokers and non-smokers alike (unlike Macro Pro). If you suspect you may be suffering from AMD, please call our office to make an appointment. The sooner treatment begins, the better.


Want Scary Eyes for Halloween? What You Need to Know About Decorative Contacts

Monday, October 22nd, 2012 
   

Halloween is a popular time for people to use decorative contact lenses. But most people do not know the sight-stealing consequences behind making these choices. Obtaining decorative lenses including colored contacts and novelty or costume lenses without a prescription is dangerous. Websites often advertise decorative contacts as if they were cosmetics, fashion accessories or toys, and their targets are often teens.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and its EyeSmart® public education program are warning parents and teens that purchasing any contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from a licensed eye care professional can cause serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to blindness. Even if someone has perfect vision, he or she needs to get an eye exam and a prescription in order to wear any kind of contacts, including cosmetic lenses.

What You Need to Know

  • It is illegal to sell decorative lenses without a prescription in the United States. Since 2005, the law has classified all contact lenses as medical devices and restricted their distribution to licensed eye care professionals.
  • See an eye care professional before using any decorative lenses: and ophthalmologist or optometrist must measure each eye in order to properly fit the contact lenses to the individual patient.
  • Lenses that are not properly fitted may scratch the eye or cause blood vessels to grow into the cornea (the clear covering of the front of the eye that is essential to seeing clearly).
  • Using any contact lenses obtained without an eye exam and prescription can lead to serious eye disorders and eye infections, which can ultimately cause permanent vision loss.
  • Contacts that are not cleaned and disinfected properly can cause painful and potentially serious infections.

Need more convincing? Check out the Academy’s 30- and 90-second public service announcement videos. If you have any questions about decorative contacts, just give South Georgia Eye Partners a call.

This article reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program (www.geteyesmart.org).


Senior Living Showcase This Saturday in Valdosta

Friday, August 17th, 2012 
   

On Saturday, August 18, South Georgia Eye Partners will be participating as a vendor at the annual Senior Living Showcase hosted by the Valdosta Daily Times. With age comes changes in vision, so come by and see us to learn more about optical solutions for the aging eye, cataract surgery with premium lenses and more!

The event is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Rainwater Conference Center. Admission is free.


Make Eye Health A Priority

Monday, May 14th, 2012 
   

May is Healthy Vision Month, and therefore, it’s the perfect time to schedule a comprehensive eye exam to make sure you are seeing your best. Don’t wait until there’s a problem to start paying attention to your eye health.

Many common eye diseases that can lead to vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic eye disease, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), often have no early warning signs or symptoms. And, the risk of vision loss or blindness is higher for some people based on race, ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, it’s important to be proactive when it comes to your vision.

You might be at higher risk for eye disease if you have a family history of vision problems; have diabetes; are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native; or are older than 50. Some diseases affect certain populations disproportionately.

  • Glaucoma, which affects your side or peripheral vision first, is three times more common in African Americans and is their leading cause of blindness.
  • Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness caused by uncontrolled diabetes, occurs more often in Hispanics/Latinos.
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives are 35 percent more likely to have diabetes than the average adult in the United States, putting them at an increased risk of diabetic eye disease.
  • Older adults are at higher risk of developing age-related eye diseases and conditions  such as AMD, glaucoma or cataracts. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Whites.

If you are at a higher risk of eye disease, having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the best thing you can do to protect your vision. It is a painless procedure where your eye doctor puts drops in the eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupil so he or she can get a good look at the back of the eye to check for signs of eye disease. You can also request an Optomap as part of your eye exam. The Optomap image allows your physician to view 82% of the retina versus traditional methods that only reveal 10-12% of the retina at one time. It is therefore another important tool for the screening and early visualization of eye problems.

In addition to having regular eye exams, eating a healthy diet, not smoking and wearing protective eyewear are just a few other things you can do to protect your vision.

 

*Source: National Eye Institute


Head to Toe Women’s Show

Thursday, April 26th, 2012 
   

Join us Saturday, April 28 from 10 am- 4 pm for the first annual Head to Toe Women’s Show at the James H. Rainwater Conference Center in Valdosta. Hosted by the Valdosta Daily Times, this women’s expo features over 60 vendors ranging from clothing and jewelry to home decor, gifts – and even eye care. We’ll be on hand to show you ladies some of our trendy designer frames and sunglasses as well as provide information on iLASIK and our family eye care services.

Admission is free, but as part of the statewide Georgia Legal Food Frenzy campaign, spearheaded by Coleman Talley law firm, attendees are asked to bring canned food items which will be donated to the local Second Harvest Food Bank.

 


South Georgia Eye Partners Receives Award

Friday, March 30th, 2012 
   

The Chamber Choice Awards breakfast, hosted by the Valdosta Chamber of Commerce, was held March 22 at the Rainwater Conference Center. We were so honored to receive the 2012 Members’ Choice award for exceptional customer service! Thank you to everyone who voted for us!