Posts Tagged ‘pink eye’


Can You Recognize the Symptoms of “Pink Eye”

Wednesday, September 16th, 2015 
   

eye

With school back in session, we anticipate an increasing number of patients with conjunctivitis, otherwise known as “pink eye.” South Georgia Eye Partners wants families, teachers and day care workers to be informed and learn to recognize the symptoms in order to avoid contracting the infection or spreading it to others.

Conjunctivitis, commonly referred to as “pink eye” is an inflammation or infection of the thin transparent layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eyelid that covers the white part of the eye. Several factors including viral or bacterial infection, allergic reaction and certain chemicals cause a person to contract conjunctivitis.  Peaslee said that most cases they’ve seen have been viral, probably an adeno virus; however, they have not asked patients to incur the cost of laboratory diagnosis since it does not change the treatment.

The bacterial and viral forms are highly contagious, especially among children; therefore, it is important that you take note if you are experiencing symptoms such as:

  • Red, very swollen, painful eyes and/or eyelids
  • Watery mucus discharge
  • Upper respiratory symptoms
  • Fever

If experiencing symptoms, first and foremost, do everything you can to avoid spreading the infection to family members, friends and co-workers.  Actions include frequent, thorough hand washing and no sharing of towels, washcloths and pillows. Additionally, it’s a good idea for the infected person not to share a sink with others. Next, individuals should seek care from an optometrist or ophthalmologist as soon as symptoms begin to manifest. Contact lenses wearers should stop wearing lenses and discard them along with cases and open bottles of solution.

Treatment for conjunctivitis depends on its cause. For the particular type of conjunctivitis South Georgia Eye Partners’ physicians see most often, an antibiotic to prevent secondary infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drops, anti-histamine drops, and in some cases, corticosteroid eye drops are typical treatments. In a few severe cases, patients have been placed on oral antihistaminic and oral anti-inflammatory medications.

Unfortunately, individuals are contagious before they have symptoms; therefore, it is very important to practice good hygiene to control the spreading of conjunctivitis.

  • Don’t touch or rub your eyes with your hands
  • Wash your hands thoroughly and frequently
  • Change your towel or washcloth daily
  • Discard eye cosmetics (particularly mascara)
  • Don’t use anyone else’s eye cosmetics or personal eye care items

The worst symptoms last seven to ten days but it may take patients up to a month to completely resolve the infection. Some patients may also experience ocular sensitivity, inflammation and “dry eyes” up to three months after the infection.

South Georgia Eye Partners is dedicated to educating the public on the infection.   Additionally, strict measures are taken in the South Georgia Eye Partners offices to ensure everything is thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.  Hand cleaner dispensers are placed throughout each office for patients, family members and staff to use frequently.

If not properly diagnosed and managed, complications from conjunctivitis can arise. Therefore, we recommend individuals with symptoms seek care immediately and encourage those exposed take all necessary precautions to prevent contracting the infection.

To learn more or to schedule an appointment, call us.


Lights, Camera, Action!

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 
   

On August 22nd, Dr. Alan Peaslee was interviewed by WALB regarding the recent wave of conjunctivitis (pink eye) cases. He discussed common symptoms and ways to avoid contracting or spreading the infection. Click here to see the story.

On Tuesday, August 28th, Dr. Ann Patel will be on Fox 31’s Good Day morning show at 7:00 a.m. providing more information to help South Georgia residents recognize the symptoms of conjunctivitis.

But that’s not all! Keep an eye out for our iLASIK and family eye care commercials. They are airing in Valdosta, Tifton and Douglas markets. If you haven’t seen them yet, click here.


Avoid Contact Lens Abuse

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 
   

Please do not intentionally overwear your contact lenses.  Eye care professionals help patients deal with the likely complications of this abuse everyday.  Potential repurcussions range from a mandated period of time without contact lens wear, to permanently impaired vision.
A new study found that many contact lens wearers in the United States do not follow the recommended replacement schedules for their lenses, making them vulnerable to a variety of eye infections.
The study examined 1,654 contact lens wearers in groups with different manufacturer-recommended replacement frequency (MRRF). It found that:

* 59 percent of two-week lens replacement silicone hydrogel wearers wore their lenses for a longer period of time.
* 29 percent of one-month replacement silicone hydrogel wearers wore them longer.
* 15 percent of daily disposable wearers wore them longer.

    Today’s economic environment may be one factor for the level of non-compliance: 26 percent of those who over-wore their lenses said they wanted “to save money” by wearing their contacts for longer periods. Fifty-one percent reported “forgetting which day to replace lenses.”
For 18 percent of participants, it was only “somewhat important” or “not important” to clean their lenses every day. And many took a casual view of lens case replacement, with 16 percent replacing it only once a year and 14 percent never replacing it.
Eye health is compromised without proper lens care and compliance with replacement schedules. Contact lens-related infections, ranging from pink eye to more serious conditions, can result from organisms that enter your eye from your fingers and become lodged under your lenses.

    This study was conducted by the Centre for Contact Lens Research and the University of Waterloo School of Optometry in collaboration with David B. Sarwer, PhD, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.