Posts Tagged ‘contact lenses’


Did You Know?

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013 
   

Did you know you can get free home delivery when you purchase a one-year supply of contact lenses? Ask us how today!


Want Scary Eyes for Halloween? What You Need to Know About Decorative Contacts

Monday, October 22nd, 2012 
   

Halloween is a popular time for people to use decorative contact lenses. But most people do not know the sight-stealing consequences behind making these choices. Obtaining decorative lenses including colored contacts and novelty or costume lenses without a prescription is dangerous. Websites often advertise decorative contacts as if they were cosmetics, fashion accessories or toys, and their targets are often teens.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and its EyeSmart® public education program are warning parents and teens that purchasing any contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from a licensed eye care professional can cause serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to blindness. Even if someone has perfect vision, he or she needs to get an eye exam and a prescription in order to wear any kind of contacts, including cosmetic lenses.

What You Need to Know

  • It is illegal to sell decorative lenses without a prescription in the United States. Since 2005, the law has classified all contact lenses as medical devices and restricted their distribution to licensed eye care professionals.
  • See an eye care professional before using any decorative lenses: and ophthalmologist or optometrist must measure each eye in order to properly fit the contact lenses to the individual patient.
  • Lenses that are not properly fitted may scratch the eye or cause blood vessels to grow into the cornea (the clear covering of the front of the eye that is essential to seeing clearly).
  • Using any contact lenses obtained without an eye exam and prescription can lead to serious eye disorders and eye infections, which can ultimately cause permanent vision loss.
  • Contacts that are not cleaned and disinfected properly can cause painful and potentially serious infections.

Need more convincing? Check out the Academy’s 30- and 90-second public service announcement videos. If you have any questions about decorative contacts, just give South Georgia Eye Partners a call.

This article reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program (www.geteyesmart.org).


Preparing for an Eye Exam

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 
   

An eye exam is not like a shopping trip to the grocery store.  It is a medical exam to see if your eyes are healthy and if necessary, to get glasses for a visual deficiency.  Being prepared for your eye exam will make the experience more pleasant.  The first step is to make an appointment with your eye doctor.  Have your name, phone number, address and insurance information available.  On the day of your appointment, try to be a few minutes early as there may be health forms that need updating.  Please take your insurance information and all of your medications with you.

We are a medical practice with four doctors and they see surgery patients as well as emergencies.  Some patients are coming in for testing only or to pick up glasses or contact lenses.  Every patient’s insurance has to be verified by their insurance company the day of service.  Please keep all these things in mind when patients are not called in the order in which they sign in.

During your exam, the doctor will check the health of your eyes.  This sometimes requires dilation of the pupils to allow him to view the retina.  The effects of dilation are blurred reading vision for a few hours afterward and large pupils which could last up to a day depending on the patient.  If you are dilated, disposable sunglasses are provided. We will test for glasses if necessary and there are other tests that may be ordered by the doctor if he sees a problem.  We perform a thorough exam.

At the end of the exam, the doctor will explain his findings and recommendations.  Our doctors treat and specialize in a variety of eye problems and recommend a yearly exam.  We have clinics in Tifton and Valdosta for your convenience, so call us for your yearly eye appointment!


Survey Says……

Monday, February 14th, 2011 
   

Many Americans Miss the Mark on Eye Exams.

A recent survey of 1,000 adults shows that nearly half — 47% — worry more about losing their sight than about losing their memory and their ability to walk or hear. But almost 30% indicated that they don’t get their eyes checked. Many Americans are unaware of the warning signs of eye diseases and conditions that could cause damage and blindness if not detected and treated soon enough.

It’s necessary to see an optometrist or ophthalmologist regularly in order to keep your eyes in good working order. Diseases and conditions of the eye can often be treated successfully if caught early. Eye professionals recommend that everyone see an eye doctor at least every two years. Many people should see their eye doctors more often. According to the American Optometric Association and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, factors such as age, eye health and family health history determine how often one should have a complete eye exam.

Call today to schedule your annual eye exam.

Karen Canada

Refractive Surgery and Marketing Director


Intralase Versus Traditional LASIK

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010 
   

Over my past 10 years practicing optometry and comanaging all different types of refractive surgery, I have never had more reason to be excited to offer surgery as an alternative to glasses or contact lenses for my patients.

The accuracy and precision provided by a three dimensional laser incision rather than the one dimensional cut of the microkeratomes steel blade results in higher quality post-operative vision that is apparent even the first day after surgery.

How does the IntraLase Method work?
The IntraLase Method uses tiny, rapid pulses of laser light to create your corneal flap — instead of using a metal blade — during the first step of LASIK. Each pulse of light passes through the top layers of your cornea and forms a microscopic bubble at a specific depth and position within your eye that is determined by the doctor. The IntraLase laser moves back and forth across your eye, creating a uniform layer of bubbles just beneath your corneal surface.
Just prior to applying laser vision correction, the doctor creates your corneal flap by gently separating the tissue where these bubbles have formed. The corneal flap is then folded back so the doctor can perform the second step of your LASIK treatment.
Please take a few minutes to watch how the procedure is performed.
What is the difference between a corneal flap created with the IntraLase Method and one created with a microkeratome?
The microkeratome is a hand-held instrument, which contains a steel blade that moves back and forth and creates a cut as it travels across the cornea. A microkeratome is only capable of making a single, one-dimensional cut across the cornea. As it cuts, the blade oscillates back and forth, which can leave an irregular surface after the flap is lifted. This can affect the quality of your postoperative vision.
Because of the unique way in which the IntraLase Method creates a precisely positioned layer of bubbles just beneath the surface of your eye, it creates a smooth even surface after your flap is lifted. With the IntraLase Method, a blade never touches your eye.
Dr. Eric Kolisz
http://www.intralasefacts.com/FAQ/

Avoid Contact Lens Abuse

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 
   

Please do not intentionally overwear your contact lenses.  Eye care professionals help patients deal with the likely complications of this abuse everyday.  Potential repurcussions range from a mandated period of time without contact lens wear, to permanently impaired vision.
A new study found that many contact lens wearers in the United States do not follow the recommended replacement schedules for their lenses, making them vulnerable to a variety of eye infections.
The study examined 1,654 contact lens wearers in groups with different manufacturer-recommended replacement frequency (MRRF). It found that:

* 59 percent of two-week lens replacement silicone hydrogel wearers wore their lenses for a longer period of time.
* 29 percent of one-month replacement silicone hydrogel wearers wore them longer.
* 15 percent of daily disposable wearers wore them longer.

    Today’s economic environment may be one factor for the level of non-compliance: 26 percent of those who over-wore their lenses said they wanted “to save money” by wearing their contacts for longer periods. Fifty-one percent reported “forgetting which day to replace lenses.”
For 18 percent of participants, it was only “somewhat important” or “not important” to clean their lenses every day. And many took a casual view of lens case replacement, with 16 percent replacing it only once a year and 14 percent never replacing it.
Eye health is compromised without proper lens care and compliance with replacement schedules. Contact lens-related infections, ranging from pink eye to more serious conditions, can result from organisms that enter your eye from your fingers and become lodged under your lenses.

    This study was conducted by the Centre for Contact Lens Research and the University of Waterloo School of Optometry in collaboration with David B. Sarwer, PhD, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.