Posts Tagged ‘glaucoma’


Glaucoma – What You Need to Know

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 
   

Senior Showcase Aug 18

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in adults over 60; however, it can occur as early as your 40’s. Since glaucoma normally progresses slowly with little or no warning signs before permanent damage has occurred, it is very important to schedule yearly eye exams to check for glaucoma and other eye health issues.

What is glaucoma?

In a healthy eye, clear fluid is constantly being made behind the iris and leaving the eye through a microscopic drainage canal in the front of the eye. If this drainage channel becomes blocked, the pressure inside the eye goes up and often causes glaucoma damage to the optic nerve. This is the nerve that connects the eye to the brain so damage to it causes loss of vision.

Who is at risk?

While the causes of glaucoma are not completely known, we do know that risk factors for its development include a family history of glaucoma, race and older age. Glaucoma may affect people of any age from newborns to the elderly but is more common in adults as they approach their senior years. African-Americans, Hispanics and people with diabetes are also at increased risk of developing the disease.

To learn more about glaucoma, it’s diagnosis and treatment, contact us today!

*Source: geteyesmart.org


Glaucoma – The Silent Thief of Sight

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 
   

IMG_5037-118A revisedGlaucoma is characterized by the loss of nerve tissue that results in loss of vision. It is often referred to as the “silent thief of sight” because of its lack of obvious symptoms.

As the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, Glaucoma most often occurs in people over age 40, although a congenital or infantile form of glaucoma does exist.  People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans over the age of 40 and Hispanics over the age of 60 are at an increased risk of developing glaucoma.  Other risk factors include thinner corneas, chronic eye inflammation, and using medications that increase the pressure in the eyes.

How is glaucoma diagnosed?  South Georgia/North Florida eye partners use a variety of tests to diagnose glaucoma including patient family history, visual acuity, evaluation of the pressure inside the eye and visual field testing among others.

One of our optometrists, Dr. Eric Kolisz, who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma says, “The biggest problem with most forms of glaucoma is that it does not change the way a patient sees or the way their eyes feel.  Those are the two logical reasons that prompt an adult to schedule an eye exam.  Therefore, without yearly exams, glaucoma can be actively damaging the eyes for years before detection. This changes the urgency and aggressiveness of treatment significantly.”

Dr. Kolisz continued, “Early detection is key to effective management of glaucoma and undoubtedly decreases the chances of life altering vision loss with this disease.”

Our doctors perform these comprehensive eye exams in all four of our offices.  If glaucoma is detected, treatment often includes either medications to reduce elevated intraocular pressure or surgery.  Surgery for glaucoma can be performed three ways:  Laser, Conventional or with Drainage Implants.  Visit our Glaucoma page to learn more.

Early detection, prompt treatment and regular monitoring can help to control glaucoma and reduce vision loss.  South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners diagnoses and treats all types of glaucoma through medications and surgeries if necessary.  Call SGEP today to set up an appointment if you feel you are showing signs of glaucoma and would like to start taking control of your eye health.


SGEP’s Dry Eye Clinic – Help for Dry Eye Syndrome Here at Home

Thursday, August 18th, 2016 
   

Young woman dripping eyes at homeSouth Georgia Eye Partners’ Accredited Dry Eye Clinic may need to be the very next stop on your “to-do” list. The doctors at SGEP  have extensive experience in the diagnosis and treatment of dry eye disease, and being certified demonstrates their expertise and dedication to providing the highest quality of dry eye care using advanced ophthalmic diagnostic techniques and treatments.

One of the most common clinical challenges faced in eye care is dry eye syndrome. Characterized by irritated, scratchy, itchy eyes, dry eye occurs when eyes are not properly lubricated because of insufficient tear production, or unbalanced tear composition. Thanks to new technology, dry eye can now be treated in ways never before available. The latest diagnostic tool – The TearLab Osmolarity System – measures tear osmolarity by taking a small sample of the patient’s tears to see how “dry” they really are. Treatment is then prescribed based on the measurements from the TearLab and range from Omega 3 supplements, tear replacement drops, punctual plugs, anti- inflammatory drops, oral antibiotics and prescription strength artificial tears.

If you are ready to address your dry eye problems, South Georgia Eye Partners has three convenient locations in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas and Madison, FL  Read more about our Dry Eye Clinic here. Contact us today to make an appointment.

South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners – with locations in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas & Madison, FL – specializes in LASIK and cataract surgery with premium lens implants, glaucoma diagnosis and treatment, comprehensive eye exams for adults and children and a Dry Eye Clinic. SGEP also has an Optical Shop fully stocked with designer frames and sunglasses to fit your style and personality.  To make an appointment with one of SGEP’s physicians or to find our locations and hours, click here.


Glaucoma: Its Diagnosis and Treatment

Thursday, April 14th, 2016 
   
Senior Showcase Aug 18Glaucoma is defined as a group of eye disorders leading to progressive damage to the optic nerve by the American Optometric Association.  It is characterized by the loss of nerve tissue that results in loss of vision. Advanced glaucoma may even cause blindness.
As the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, Glaucoma most often occurs in people over age 40, although a congenital or infantile form of glaucoma does exist.  People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans over the age of 40 and Hispanics over the age of 60 are at an increased risk of developing glaucoma.  Other risk factors include thinner corneas, chronic eye inflammation, and using medications that increase the pressure in the eyes.
How is glaucoma diagnosed?
Glaucoma is diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination.  Testing includes:
  • Patient history to determine family history and symptoms
  • Visual acuity measurements to determine the extent which vision may be affected
  • Tonometry to measure pressure inside the eye
  • Pachymetry to measure corneal thickness
  • Visual field testing to check if the field of vision has been affected by glaucoma
  • Evaluation of the retina which may include photographs of the optic nerve
  • Supplemental testing may include gonioscopy, a procedure allowing views of the angle anatomy and serial tonometry which acquires several pressure measurements over time
South Georgia Eye Partners performs these comprehensive eye exams in all three of their offices.  If glaucoma is detected, treatment often includes either medications to reduce elevated intraocular pressure or surgery.  Surgery for glaucoma can be performed three ways:
  • Laser surgery – laser trabeculoplasty helps fluid drain out of the eye.
  • Conventional surgery – if eye drops and laser surgery aren’t effective in controlling eye pressure, you may need a filtering procedure called a trabeculectomy.  Filtering microsurgery involves creating a drainage flap, allowing fluid to percolate into and later drain into the vascular system.
  • Drainage implants – this type of surgery may be an option for people with uncontrolled glaucoma, secondary glaucoma or for children with glaucoma.  A small silicone tube is inserted in the eye to help drain aqueous fluid
There is no cure for glaucoma, but by keeping eye pressure under control, continued damage to the optic nerve and continued loss of your visual field may slow or stop.  Early detection, prompt treatment and regular monitoring can help to control glaucoma and reduce vision loss.  South Georgia Eye Partners diagnoses and treats all types of glaucoma through medications and surgeries if necessary.  Call SGEP today to set up an appointment if you feel you are showing signs of glaucoma and would like to start taking control of your eye health.
*Source:  American Optometric Association

Make Eye Health A Priority

Monday, May 14th, 2012 
   

May is Healthy Vision Month, and therefore, it’s the perfect time to schedule a comprehensive eye exam to make sure you are seeing your best. Don’t wait until there’s a problem to start paying attention to your eye health.

Many common eye diseases that can lead to vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic eye disease, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), often have no early warning signs or symptoms. And, the risk of vision loss or blindness is higher for some people based on race, ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, it’s important to be proactive when it comes to your vision.

You might be at higher risk for eye disease if you have a family history of vision problems; have diabetes; are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native; or are older than 50. Some diseases affect certain populations disproportionately.

  • Glaucoma, which affects your side or peripheral vision first, is three times more common in African Americans and is their leading cause of blindness.
  • Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness caused by uncontrolled diabetes, occurs more often in Hispanics/Latinos.
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives are 35 percent more likely to have diabetes than the average adult in the United States, putting them at an increased risk of diabetic eye disease.
  • Older adults are at higher risk of developing age-related eye diseases and conditions  such as AMD, glaucoma or cataracts. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Whites.

If you are at a higher risk of eye disease, having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the best thing you can do to protect your vision. It is a painless procedure where your eye doctor puts drops in the eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupil so he or she can get a good look at the back of the eye to check for signs of eye disease. You can also request an Optomap as part of your eye exam. The Optomap image allows your physician to view 82% of the retina versus traditional methods that only reveal 10-12% of the retina at one time. It is therefore another important tool for the screening and early visualization of eye problems.

In addition to having regular eye exams, eating a healthy diet, not smoking and wearing protective eyewear are just a few other things you can do to protect your vision.

 

*Source: National Eye Institute


Glaucoma

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010 
   

Recently saw a patient with very high intra ocular pressures and a strong family history of glaucoma. I initiated medical therapy but will most likely ask Dr. Petermann to evaluate the patient for SLT surgery. I hope to see the the patient this week in our Valdosta location.