Posts Tagged ‘eye doctors madison’


Dr. Wes Ross Joins Mission Trip to Honduras

Monday, November 12th, 2018 
   

This September, South Georgia/ North Florida Ophthalmologist Dr. Wes Ross traveled to Honduras with a mission group to conduct medical clinics and volunteer construction in several rural villages.  The group is called IC13; they’re based in Nashville, TN and they make a few trips a year to hold these clinics and help with infrastructure.

Dr. Ross and his wife, Shannon – a registered nurse – joined the group that included two ER doctors, a cardiologist, dentists, nurses and technicians.  The two worked in 4 villages over 4 days – each day riding 1-2 hours into some mountainous regions to get there.

“Generally around 700 people came to each clinic each day for medical exams, medicines, dental procedures, and we say over 100-150 people in the eye clinic each day,” recalls Dr. Ross.

The clinics took place in open-air school buildings in the center of the villages, and most of the work that Dr. Ross was involved in was determining which glasses (of the over 500 pairs of prescriptions glasses donated and several hundred pairs of over-the-counter reader glasses) would help the person the most and matching a pair of donated glasses to them.

Dr. Ross said that there were a few people that had issues requiring surgery, and the IC13 organization was able to pay for them to go to the ophthalmology clinic at the nearest city to be treated.

“We found lots of cataracts, some glaucoma, a few congenital issues, and a retinal detachment that we were able to refer,” says Dr. Ross. “Shannon has helped me run our eye clinics on our previous trips to Uganda, so we were able to really run things efficiently together.”

Our Eye Partners family is so proud to have Dr. Ross as a part of our team – he truly gives back in every way.

 


Big News! Dr. Garrett Webster Joins South Georgia / North Florida Eye Partners

Friday, July 27th, 2018 
   

We are so excited to announce that we are bringing a new ophthalmologist on board at South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners! Dr. Garrett Webster is now a part of the Eye Partners family.

Dr. Webster graduated from the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine in 2014. He specializes in comprehensive cataract surgery.  Dr. Webster grew up on family farm in Augusta, and is looking forward to becoming a part of Valdosta and south Georgia! He and his wife, Sydney, have a daughter, Ginny, who is not quite 2 years old, and a sweet Boykin Spaniel, Brice.

South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners is thrilled to add this accomplished physician to our staff. The more we grow, the better we can serve our patients.


Diabetic Eye: Diagnosis and Treatment

Thursday, July 12th, 2018 
   

Diabetes.  We probably all have our own reaction to this disease and know at least something about its effects – it is a disease that affects the body’s ability to produce or use insulin effectively to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. But did you know that diabetes also can have devastating effects on your eyes and vision?  Too much glucose in the blood for a long time can cause damage in many parts of the body, including the heart, kidneys, blood vessels and the small blood vessels in the eyes.  South Georgia / North Florida Eye Partners encourages everyone to have annual eye exams, but for those patients with diabetes – these yearly exams can be critical in preventing vision loss.

When the blood vessels in the eye’s retina (the light sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye) swell, leak or close off completely — or if abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina — it is called diabetic retinopathy.

People who are at greater risk of developing diabetic retinopathy are those who have diabetes or poor blood sugar control, women who are pregnant, and people with high blood pressure, high blood lipids or both. Also, people who are from certain ethnic groups, such as African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans, are more likely to develop diabetic retinopathy. In fact, a new study confirms that diabetes is a top risk factor for vision loss among Hispanics.

Something to remember: diabetes can cause vision in your eyes to change even if you do not have retinopathy. If your blood sugar levels change quickly, it can affect the shape of your eye’s lens, causing blurry vision, which goes back to normal after your blood sugar stabilizes.

With offices in Valdosta, Douglas, Tifton, Moultrie and Madison, Florida, Eye Partners is equipped to perform comprehensive eye exams close to where you live.  We also perform more extensive procedures and surgeries such as cataract surgery, iLASIK and glaucoma treatment in our surgery center in Valdosta.  Call or visit us today to make an appointment.

Source:  American Academy of Ophthalmology


Eye Exams for the Whole Family

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018 
   

Regardless of your age or physical health, it’s important to have regular eye exams. South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners provides vision care for the entire family – toddlers to seniors.

During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

A comprehensive eye exam includes a number of tests and procedures to examine and evaluate the health of your eyes and the quality of your vision. These tests range from simple ones, like having you read an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using a high-powered lens to examine the health of the tissues inside of your eyes.

Eye care experts recommend you have a complete eye exam every year to assess your risk for potentially damaging eye conditions, as well as to keep on top of any changes in vision you may be experiencing.

Children. Some experts estimate that approximately 5% to 10% of pre-schoolers and 25% of school-aged children have vision problems. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), all children should have their eyes examined at 6 months of age, at age 3 and again at the start of school. Children without vision problems or risk factors for eye or vision problems should then continue to have their eyes examined at every year throughout school.

Children with existing vision problems or risk factors should have their eyes examined more frequently. Common risk factors for vision problems include:

  • premature birth
  • developmental delays
  • turned or crossed eyes
  • family history of eye disease
  • history of eye injury
  • other physical illness or disease

The AOA recommends that children who wear eyeglasses or contact lenses should have their eyes examined at least every 12 months or according to their eye doctor’s instructions.

Adults. The AOA also recommends an annual eye exam for any adult who wears eyeglasses or contacts. If you don’t normally need vision correction, you still need an eye exam every year. Doctors often recommend more frequent examinations for adults with diabetes, high blood pressure and other disorders, because many diseases can have an impact on vision and eye health.

If you are over 40, it’s a good idea to have your eyes examined every one to two years to check for common age-related eye problems such as presbyopia, cataracts and macular degeneration. Read more about Vision after 40.

Because the risk of eye disease continues to increase with advancing age, everyone over the age of 60 should be examined annually. Read more about Vision after 60.

Call South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners today to schedule an appointment for all the members of your family.  Preventative vision care is the key to seeing well for years to come.

Source: AOA


Multifocal Lenses – What are they and when do I consider them?

Tuesday, April 10th, 2018 
   

iStock_000001004232SmallMost people don’t know that contact lenses can be bifocal, trifocal, or even progressive.  South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners offers all of these options, and we will help you decide what works best for you and your lifestyle.

New multifocal contacts are being designed each year for people with presbyopia, a natural condition brought on by age, where the eye’s natural lens stiffens and loses the ability to focus on close objects.

If you’re presbyopic, you’re not alone. Eventually, almost everyone is, usually after age 40.

Where people do differ is how they deal with it. Some use reading glasses or bifocals. Others choose progressive eyeglass lenses, which correct near, intermediate, and far vision but without the unsightly lines of traditional bifocals. Still others opt for bifocal contact lenses.

There are several contact lens designs that help you see both close up and far away, as well as correct astigmatism.

One type has a distance viewing area in most of the lens and a near viewing segment in the middle lower portion. Another has a series of concentric rings, where the visual system constantly adjusts focus for distance and near.

To get started with multifocal lenses, your eye care practitioner will determine your near vision acuity and then choose a design that works best with your cornea size and shape, tear film, blink pattern and lifestyle. As with any new multifocal eyewear, you’ll also receive brief training on the best way to use the lenses, as well as a follow-up appointment to be sure you’ve adapted to them.  Call us for an appointment today.

South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners – with locations in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas, Moultrie and Madison, FL – specializes in iLASIK and cataract surgery with premium lens implants, glaucoma diagnosis and treatment, comprehensive eye exams for adults and children and a Dry Eye Clinic. Eye Partners also has an Optical Shop fully stocked with designer frames and sunglasses to fit your style and personality.  To make an appointment with one of our physicians or to find our locations and hours, click here

Additional information provided by contactlenses.org


Eye Partners’ Dry Eye Clinic – Help for Dry Eye Syndrome Here at Home

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018 
   

One of the most common clinical challenges faced in eye care is dry eye syndrome. Characterized by irritated, scratchy, itchy eyes, dry eye occurs when eyes are not properly lubricated because of insufficient tear production, or unbalanced tear composition. Thanks to new technology, dry eye can now be treated in ways never before available. The latest diagnostic tool – The TearLab Osmolarity System – measures tear osmolarity by taking a small sample of the patient’s tears to see how “dry” they really are. Treatment is then prescribed based on the measurements from the TearLab and range from Omega 3 supplements, tear replacement drops, punctual plugs, anti- inflammatory drops, oral antibiotics and prescription strength artificial tears.

If you are ready to address your dry eye problems, South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners has three convenient locations in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas, Moultrie and Madison, FL  Read more about our Dry Eye Clinic here. Contact us today to make an appointment.

South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners – with locations in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas, Moultrie & Madison, FL – specializes in LASIK and cataract surgery with premium lens implants, glaucoma diagnosis and treatment, comprehensive eye exams for adults and children and a Dry Eye Clinic. SGNF also has an Optical Shop fully stocked with designer frames and sunglasses to fit your style and personality.  To make an appointment with one of SGNF’s physicians or to find our locations and hours, click here.


Doctor Spotlight: Dr. Melanie Hill

Thursday, November 9th, 2017 
   

This week we are spotlighting Dr. Melanie Hill.  Dr. Hill works in our Madison, Florida, office and has been a wonderful addition to our South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners family.  Dr. Hill graduated from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tennessee, where she met her husband, Cory.  After graduation, they moved together to Cory’s native Florida and have been there since 2000.  She and her husband have two children, Reagan and Cooper, who keep Dr. Hill busy even when not at work.

When asked what she loves most about optometry, Dr. Hill says, “I think it’s an honor to be able to protect one of the biggest blessings God gave us – sight.”  Back in high school, Dr. Hill was assigned a research paper and she happened to write hers on optometry – the more she learned about the field, the more interested she became.  And the rest – as they say – is history.  Watch the video here to see Dr. Hill in action and hear her story in her own words.

Dr. Hill and her family are very active at Faith Presbyterian Church in Tallahassee.  She is an Elder at their church and the co-Moderator of the Children and Families Committee as well as a Sunday school teacher.

South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners has two board-certified ophthalmologists and five board-certified optometrists.  Our physicians are trained in scheduled eye exams as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, and many other optical issues.  We also perform iLASIK surgery, laser-assisted cataract surgery and many other vision procedures.  With offices in Valdosta, Tifton, Douglas, Moultrie and Madison, Florida, there is certain to be a location convenient to you for all of your optometry needs.  Call us today to schedule an appointment.


Glaucoma – What You Need to Know

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 
   

Senior Showcase Aug 18

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in adults over 60; however, it can occur as early as your 40’s. Since glaucoma normally progresses slowly with little or no warning signs before permanent damage has occurred, it is very important to schedule yearly eye exams to check for glaucoma and other eye health issues.

What is glaucoma?

In a healthy eye, clear fluid is constantly being made behind the iris and leaving the eye through a microscopic drainage canal in the front of the eye. If this drainage channel becomes blocked, the pressure inside the eye goes up and often causes glaucoma damage to the optic nerve. This is the nerve that connects the eye to the brain so damage to it causes loss of vision.

Who is at risk?

While the causes of glaucoma are not completely known, we do know that risk factors for its development include a family history of glaucoma, race and older age. Glaucoma may affect people of any age from newborns to the elderly but is more common in adults as they approach their senior years. African-Americans, Hispanics and people with diabetes are also at increased risk of developing the disease.

To learn more about glaucoma, it’s diagnosis and treatment, contact us today!

*Source: geteyesmart.org


Glaucoma – The Silent Thief of Sight

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 
   

IMG_5037-118A revisedGlaucoma is characterized by the loss of nerve tissue that results in loss of vision. It is often referred to as the “silent thief of sight” because of its lack of obvious symptoms.

As the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, Glaucoma most often occurs in people over age 40, although a congenital or infantile form of glaucoma does exist.  People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans over the age of 40 and Hispanics over the age of 60 are at an increased risk of developing glaucoma.  Other risk factors include thinner corneas, chronic eye inflammation, and using medications that increase the pressure in the eyes.

How is glaucoma diagnosed?  South Georgia/North Florida eye partners use a variety of tests to diagnose glaucoma including patient family history, visual acuity, evaluation of the pressure inside the eye and visual field testing among others.

One of our optometrists, Dr. Eric Kolisz, who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma says, “The biggest problem with most forms of glaucoma is that it does not change the way a patient sees or the way their eyes feel.  Those are the two logical reasons that prompt an adult to schedule an eye exam.  Therefore, without yearly exams, glaucoma can be actively damaging the eyes for years before detection. This changes the urgency and aggressiveness of treatment significantly.”

Dr. Kolisz continued, “Early detection is key to effective management of glaucoma and undoubtedly decreases the chances of life altering vision loss with this disease.”

Our doctors perform these comprehensive eye exams in all four of our offices.  If glaucoma is detected, treatment often includes either medications to reduce elevated intraocular pressure or surgery.  Surgery for glaucoma can be performed three ways:  Laser, Conventional or with Drainage Implants.  Visit our Glaucoma page to learn more.

Early detection, prompt treatment and regular monitoring can help to control glaucoma and reduce vision loss.  South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners diagnoses and treats all types of glaucoma through medications and surgeries if necessary.  Call SGEP today to set up an appointment if you feel you are showing signs of glaucoma and would like to start taking control of your eye health.


Doctor Spotlight: Dr. Melanie Hill

Monday, August 8th, 2016 
   

IMG_4973 revisedWe are continuing our doctor spotlight with Dr. Melanie Hill.  Dr. Hill works in our Madison, Florida, office and has been a great addition to the South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners team.  Dr. Hill graduated from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tennessee, where she met her husband, Cory.  They graduated together, and moved together to Cory’s native Florida in 2000.  They have now been married for 17 years.

Dr. Hill got her undergraduate degree at the University of Missouri and is a huge sports fan…she loves her Mizzou Tigers!  She also is an avid St. Louis Cardinals fan – as she says, “I take my baseball very seriously.”  She and her husband have two children, Reagan (11) and Cooper (6).  Dr. Hill says most of her free time is spent chasing her kids and being a “typical taxi mom” – taking their kids to ballet and baseball and back again.  The Hills also love to snow ski (they try to take a trip once a year) as well as playing their pool and grilling out.
Dr. Hill and her family are very active at Faith Presbyterian Church in Tallahassee.  She is an Elder at their church and the co-Moderator of the Children and Families Committee as well as a Sunday school teacher.
When reflecting on her adopted hometown of Madison and her team at South Georgia/North Florida Eye Partners, Dr. Hill says, “I grew up in a small town, and in many ways, Madison reminds me of home.  I love that in a small town I am able to take care of generations of families.  Joining SGEP has been a huge blessing.  We have so many more resources available to us now.  Having Dr. Petermann come into the Madison office monthly saves people rom having to travel so far.”  Dr. Hill also added that “there is just a higher level of care that I am so glad can be given to the people in Madison county.”
We are proud to have you on our team, Dr. Hill.  You have added so much to our practice.